Digimon COTD: Chip D

Chip D—pure card manipulation.

What’s good about it: Chip D lets you choose between 3 very powerful effects, or get a second one for the price of 1 discard (the same as playing 2 Chip-D at the same time). Corrupt 5 is beyond the normal limit for wrecking your opponent’s ability to draw effectively. Static 5 gives complete control over decks that love to use their trash as a second resource, or which can recycle cards like its partner, Aces, Firewalls, and other select cards. The “trash any” effect snipes the best 2 cards in the opponent’s deck for that moment, including their partner. “Chip” named cards are supported by Ace Chip.

Each of these effects can be combined in devastating ways: Trash any 2 cards, then static them so they’re effectively deleted straight from the deck. Corrupt 5 and then Static 5 to seal any possibilities not on the field already or in the opponent’s immediate hand. Trash any 2 and then corrupt 5 to remove the best possibilities from their deck and make their next mulligan garbage—effectively turning off the mulligan mechanic unless your opponent can take a huge risk (if good cards are in the top 5, it also means you eliminated more than 2 good cards). You can also use the “trash any” effect to reveal the entire contents of the opponent’s deck.

This chip is also a proxy card, so you can pair it with any partner support effect that adds another similar utility option (such as opponent discard), one with opposite-effects that benefit yourself (like recode, recycle, or draw), and arguably the best pairing—battle supports to make up for its lack of usability there. Partner Finder becomes an immensely horrifying combo in that case.

What’s bad about it: This card can’t help in the battle and tends to be used in “win-more” situations (meaning doesn’t help you when you’re behind). Without a discardable card, Chip D is far less effective for what you get. The deck sniping is virtually useless if the opponent’s best cards are already out of their deck. You can’t target their Ace or Firewalls for sniping, which are usually the targets you most desperately want to hit.

Tips: Chip D is the anti-mulligan card. Almost every time you get ahead in KOs (just after a KO), the opponent will mulligan for a partner. Sniping that partner and deleting it after (or sniping + corrupting 5) means that’s not possible, and any other mulligan may also be impossible. I would argue with the idea that Chip D is “win-more” in most situations where you appear ahead. Digimon Battle Evolution allows many comeback moments which can be devastating, but Chip D stops those. Sometimes you can lose a game because you have less KOs but a better position (such as higher level), then you KO the opponent and they mulligan for some killer card and win. This chip will stop such situations by cementing your superior current position, regardless of your KO count. Sealing the deck in more than one way and sealing the available trash gives you a lockdown on the available stuff for the opponent, which makes the game more manageable and come down to what’s in their hand. If you also have a void or two ready to go, the wake of Chip D is a completely sealed game where they must fight your Digimon without tricks. A well-placed Net Worm before this card is even more horrifying, since it means most opponent’s hand will go to 0 and then never recover. This can be a heavy advantage-maker when paired with other Corrupt effects, ultimately filtering one or both decks into oblivion. Specifically, Lucky Banquet is a huge benefactor of Chip D, since you just need to know one of the cards on the top 3 of either deck. Ace Chip lets you make a Chip-based deck that uses this card heavily for extra Power regardless of effect chosen. With Golemon, the Corrupt 5 can add Trash 5 or Boost +500 Power. If you can Corrupt 5, Trash 5, and then Static 5, it’s immensely devastating.

Alice White

Alice is the webmaster of VMundi, author, editor, mathematician, and autodidact. She has over 9 years of publishing experience writing articles for various self-run sites. Her interests include game design, economics, Game Theory, graphical design, and mathematics.

Leave a comment