July 2017

Digimon COTD: Gold Treasure

Gold Treasure—A Partnerable Option that helps you get Champions and Ultimates from your deck.

What’s good about it: Gold Treasure can fetch you a Digimon for evolution; or you can be cheeky and use it to toolbox supports. The card you search can be one that either has your active in its evo-box or has some card you reveal from hand in its evo-box. The reveal isn’t forced—you don’t have to give up any extra info to your opponent if you only need something that comes from your active.

What’s bad about it: This card is a utility card, it helps you for the next turn, not this one.

Tips: Gold Treasure can let you run a wider variety of Champions and Ultimates in your deck and toolbox them for support and evolution box effects. It’s also really helpful for setting up DNA evolution for Ultimates. You can also do really weird things with some of the less-orthodox evo-box names like “Whamon”. If you have the Ultimate Whamon in hand or on active, you can search the same card! If you want to hedge your bets and you have set this as a Partner Option, use it on a Rookie with a good immediate effect: “Renamon” has a void effect that can come in handy when you need something now, while Gold Treasure can set you up if you’re fine.

Digimon COTD: Chip D

Chip D—pure card manipulation of both players decks.

What’s good about it: Chip D lets you know what cards are coming and set-up your deck a little: Recode means you get to look at that many cards from the top of your deck and put them on the top or bottom. “Chip” named cards will become searchable by effects in the upcoming Data Breakers set. You also get a heavy control over your opponent’s deck with Corruption—an effect that lets you seal the opponent’s top two cards in the deck back down or to the bottom.

What’s bad about it: This card is a pure set-up card (it gives you nothing substantial when you play it.) It wont help you when you’re behind. You need to be keeping up with your opponent and wait for the right opportunity to play this.

Tips: Chip D is good when played with powerful trash-cost effects like “Mega Chip” and “Dark Wings.” These cards help both by giving you trash to work with for the “recycle any 2”, and by giving you a very powerful effect to make up for this setup card. This can be a heavy advantage-maker when paired with other Recode/Corrupt effects, ultimately filtering one or both decks into oblivion. “DB006” and “DB007” let you make a Chip-based deck that uses this card heavily for consistently obtaining various Chips.

Digimon COTD: Beam Gun

Beam Gun—Make your Power 0 to halve your opponent’s HP.

What’s good about it: Beam Gun can turn a lop-sided fight in your favor—giving you a virtual attack that is much higher in situations where you’re behind. It’s very helpful for Crash and Counter attacks since they already have 0 Power.

What’s bad about it: Halving isn’t always going to be better than a normal attack, so this card requires specific timing and doesn’t work well when you’re already ahead. Escape Raft is better in situations where halving + attacking would score, and you can spare the 7 cards to trash.

Tips: Run Beam Gun with Crash Digimon, or high HP Digimon (which tend to have lower Power). Try to save Beam Gun for when your opponent gets up to Mega, since they can’t evolve to recover the HP this removes and can set you up for 2 KO points. Running other Beam-Gun-like effects such as “Gazimon” can really help iteratively bring down tanks.

Digimon COTD: Super Tag

Super Tag—an Evolution card that provides +10P and save all your other DP after you evolve.

What’s good about it: Super Tag puts itself into DP, so it doesn’t take your one Rack-up for the turn. It’s one of the few Evolution cards that work when going to Mega. Saving your DP for later has obvious evolution benefits, as well as assisting some effects.

What’s bad about it: This card does nothing for you if you don’t have other cards charged to DP (and progressively better the more you have)—”+10P” is helpful but gets you nowhere on its own. You don’t get to keep your DP if you use an Evolution card that requires DP like “Warp Digivolve”. Since it has to be deleted, you have to plan carefully around the precious few times you can use it.

Tips: This card is amazing for decks that want to evolve quickly and keep evolving consistently. It helps card effects like Rusttyrannomon, Devidramon and Weregarurumon become really powerful. Playing it with the Evolution card “Digivice” will give you even more ways to keep your DP for later. Don’t bother trying to stack Recycle effects to re-use this, since it gets deleted, but recycling can still help you get it in the first place, in case it gets trashed or discarded.

Digimon COTD: RedOtamamon

RedOtamamon—the only “+40P” in the game thus far.

What’s good about it: RedOtamamon gives +40P—double the average Rookie. Its effect is small but useful: looking at your opponents hand can help you chose attacks, future supports and determine whether it’s the right time to use any “Activate” abilities you have. It is also outside of support phase so good luck voiding it.

What’s bad about it: RedO’s ability shuts of your support for the turn, so it’s harder to use the info you get. His body is terrible, though if you’re actually attempting to use this in , Rookie bodies don’t matter much to you anyway.

Tips: This card is well suited for fast evolve decks; 40DP with get you to majority of Champions and Ultimates in the game. Its effect helps when you’re ahead, letting you leverage the information you gained to stay there (one turn late). Evolution cards like “Warp Digivolve” and “Hyper Digivolve” help the 40DP from RedO take you much farther.

Digimon COTD: RustTyrannomon

RustTyrannomon—A Mega with a huge potential power boost or heal.

What’s good about it: The “Activate” effect of RustTyrannomon happens when attacks are revealed—on either player’s turn. The +50% multiplier gives you a huge boost to either Power or HP, whichever is most needed at the time, which makes this a tough card to overtake.

What’s bad about it: You have to use —the easiest attack to stop in the game. RustTyrannomon’s own ability is rather dull (most of the time Counter on a Mega is worse than using your other attacks). You have to discard everything; your hand, your DP, and your attachments, which is a huge price and will cost you the game if used flippantly.

Tips: It’s best to use RustTyrannomon’s “Activate” as a threat, not a promise. Once it’s used, it’s done and your opponent just has to adapt but until then, it’s still formidable. Evolution cards like “Super Tag” and “Digivice” leave your DP alone, letting you charge Rusty like a proton cannon. Cards that allow you to easily support from the top or draw extra cards can keep your hand high without giving up supports. The card “Training Manual” is good both the turn you use his ability, and the turn after.

Always try to see if there’s a way to threaten a one-hit-kill with him first, make your opponent outplay it, then just boost your power some other way. HP gain is usually the best and safest option and can allow you to replenish your hand quickly, which can surprise an unprepared opponent. Try to see if your opponent has any cards that force discards such as “Scummon’s Curse” before committing the activation or you may find yourself using a weaker cannon and have an impossible time recovering.

Torment Prep

Tournament Preparation

It can be stressful to prepare for tournaments—you have to worry about deck construction, learning the meta, and what what makes you look the most like a main character. Here are some tips to help you prepare for your next tournament.

Deck Construction

Arguably the most important part of prep—you need to have the best cardboard available. Always make sure to go to whatever deck editor website is the most popular for the game your’e playing, search by “Most expensive”, and take the top result. Sure you might end up with 50 money cards and no cohesion at all but they should have thought of that before the prices were so good. You get what you pay for in this world, so more = better. Read more

Digimon COTD: Digi-Diamond

Digi-Diamond—the Swiss-army-knife of Ace cards.

What’s good about it: Digi-Diamond is currently the most versatile Ace. “Any Phase” timing extends the number of cards you can play per turn (and is extremely powerful and limited). Changing your attack in the support phase is powerful, since you can evade a counter or buff a different attack. Changing your type can help you get around “x3 VS” and aid in evolution. HP Recovery and the revive effect both help you keep your current Digimon, for evolution purposes or dealing a finishing blow (best on the opponent’s turn). Draw 2 is icing on the cake that make this one of the more powerful cards and the Ace you can’t go wrong with.

What’s bad about it: The power gain, like every other effect of Digi-Diamond is small. Each Individual effect has specific uses, and most of them don’t really assist each other—you’re usually going to play this for one of its effects at a time and just get the others as nice bonuses.

Tips: Digi-Diamond is a good starting point for the deck’s Ace if you’re not sure what it needs. Playing Recycle effects lets this card shine, allowing you to use it for whichever effect is the most helpful now and then recycle it back for later. If you find yourself using Digi-Diamond for the Draw 2 most of the time, use a different Ace. Other Aces do much more than just draw—yours will get outpaced by them.

Digimon COTD: Witchmon

Witchmon is a  Champion that Boosts Power and can evolve to types.

What’s good about it: to zero” is one of the rarest abilities in the game—it shuts down Cross-reliant Digimon and strategies like “Drain”, “x3 VS” and “1st Attack”. “Attacks cannot be countered” is powerful and not found on any other champions, so far. +30P is higher than average, helping speed up evolution. Evolving to  type lets you play “Angewomon” for “Mastemon” decks, and other / crossover decks.

What’s bad about it: It’s not fully , so it can’t evolve from . Witchmon’s support reduces both and to 0, making top-deck supporting risky.

Tips: This card is a tactical choice for your Destiny Zone If your partner is BKGatomon. Witchmon’s support ability plays well with Cross abilities like “x3 VS”, “1st Attack” and “Drain”.

Way less interesting than Breaking Bad

Street Dates Are Nonsense

More rumors of street breaks for Dragon Ball Super

Why They Exist

For those unaware, a “street date” is a restriction of sale dictated by a company regarding their product. For example, the sale of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince could not be conducted before the given date (oh god, the spoilers). Industries originally put these in place to keep larger stores from over-running smaller stores, like a sort of self-regulating form of capitalism. They’re not in the law and there can ultimately end up being little to no consequence, depending on if terms of service or a contract is involved. Large stores could use early sales as a form of arbitrage against smaller stores, ruining any chances of the latter having a fair shot. Sounds like I’m for them right? No.

In particular, this is a response to the never-ending accusations of Dragon Ball Super having broken street dates 1-2 weeks ahead of time. Several of these accusations have been fake, caused by baseless and poorly-researched rumors. However, new accusations keep coming so I’m not even going to bother researching or calling them out. Ultimately there’s going to come a time where a store does actually break street date and I want to lay some shit down in that inevitable event:

Why This is Bullshit

Once a distributor puts it in a store’s hands, there’s nothing Bandai (or most any company) can do legally to stop the sale or even punish them. There’s no contract signed to which stores must adhere. It’s an arbitrary capitalistic control scheme and means exactly nothing (remember the part about self-regulation?). Let me paint you a picture—a store spends hundreds of dollars on cases of product for a game (especially a new one from a company with bad history like Bandai) and are somehow socially expected to eat that capital loss for a month or more with no safety net just to stick to an arbitrary date. Read more

Digimon COTD: Concert Crash

Concert Crash makes your power the same as your HP then halves your HP.

What’s good about it: It gives you Crash without your Health being reduced to 10. Unlike Crash, if your HP changes your power will not.

What’s bad about it: The HP reduction happens before any attack, making it harder to use on your opponents turn. The card is dangerous to use when your HP is low.

Tips: It is best to play this when you can get a KO—high health Digimon make this far more likely, while Digimon with First Attack make it easier to use on your opponents turn. Decks that are specialized for Crash can use this to survive Crash attacks they otherwise wouldn’t.

Digimon COTD: Mutate

Mutate allows you to evolve to the same level and heal.

What’s good about it: This card allows you to refresh HP (with a bonus), evolve from the Abnormal state, and removes Type restrictions when evolving. You can quickly evolve to a Champion or Ultimate by playing one as abnormal, then “Mutating” into the same level.

What’s bad about it: Mutate requires DP, gives no discounts and you can’t change level with it.

Tips: It is absolutely great for stalling strategies, letting you refresh your Active Digimon and raising your HP. It can also help you come back after your digimon gets KOed. This card allows you to run a higher number of C/U Digimon—especially when paired with other Evolve cards like “Level Crush” and “D-link”.

Digimon COTD: ShogunGekomon

ShogunGekomon, Is an Ultimate level Digimon with an exceptional body and a support that searches for a Champion.

What’s good about it: Shogungekomon’s strong combination of a good HP, solid attack power distribution, and the powerful attack being , makes it a difficult opponent to contend. Adding Drain to this mix means the Shogun can stall and support for quite a while if it becomes outmatched. Generally, any Digimon with a high is tough to beat since you can’t rely on as many tricks. Combine this with the ability to search out Champions to charge DP, exploit Nature’s tactical, well, nature, and you have yourself a recipe for a solid toolbox.

What’s bad about itHaving Drain is a two-edged sword most of the time; it usually means your printed HP is going to be a bit lower than comparably-costed Digimon. Shogungekomon is no exception here—1400 HP puts him right about where a 40 cost Ultimate with Drain should be and no higher. This means most other Ultimates of the same cost are going to steamroll him if he doesn’t commit to Drain in order to hang on until an appropriate support comes along to assist. Additionally, the Champion you search is one your opponent now knows about, so it could be played around if you choose poorly or get stuck in a bad spot.

Tips: Keep an eye out for “Also counts as  type” in other printed frame colors like Monochromon. Make sure you load up your deck with a few reliable Champions that are hard to punish, such as Drimogemon, Galgomon, or Garurumon. Make sure you set up a clear role for evolving to Shogungekomon—using the DP bonus, DNA or neither; otherwise your Champion selection might interfere. Don’t get caught in a Drain-lock for too long, where you can’t afford to play anything but Drain and nothing is fixing it—take a few mulligans to get out of it and start coming back.

Digimon COTD: Level Crush

Level Crush! An evolution card that lets you evolve downward and double your HP.

What’s good about it: It more than refreshes your HP with very little card investment, keeping you going on the same active far longer than usual. It also lets you use your Mega and then evolve when you get low—forever denying the 2 KO points that Megas provide.

What’s bad about it: This card is practically useless when you’re losing, or stuck on Champion. Using it while behind in points could propel you even further behind if the opponent has a solid evolution strategy. The fact that it takes your evolve for the turn can really slow down your game.

Tips: Level crush is best used when you’re running Champions with a lot of health. It is best to avoid using it until you’re low on HP or are above Champion. Having Champions with good abilities like Jamming and Shatter can send the game spiraling into a never ending slog for your opponent. Mix with the card “Mutate” for best results.

Digimon COTD: Chainsaw

Chainsaw. An Option played in the Support phase that triples your power. Then after the battle, if you’re still alive, you go straight to 10 HP.

What’s good about it: What’s great about this Option is how it really helps come back from an absolute pummeling. Especially if used on the opponent’s turn, so you go into your own turn ready to evolve and heal yourself back up.

What’s bad about it: It’s essentially useless with a Drain ability since the 10 HP occurs at the end phase, and doesn’t work at all with Crash or Counter, but few things do. Meaning Chainsaw is for playing it straight: using , or an attacky-.

Tips: You can get massive numbers if paired with a that has “x3 VS”, which will sextuple them. If used like this versus a Mega level, you can earn 2KOs for the one you will inevitably lose. Securing a dominant position with Chainsaw can only be done if it’s your opponent’s turn when you play it and you can evolve next turn. Otherwise, you’re just setting yourself up so they can knock you down.