All posts by: Zoey White

Digimon COTD: Research

Research—what does the scouter say?

What’s good about it: Knowledge of hidden information is a rare thing in Digimon Battle Evolution. Having not only hidden knowledge but also the ability to change your choices based on it is even rarer. The draw effect is just icing on the cake. Since Research can be a proxy, it has added searchability for Partner-centric cards like Partner Finder. Research can help you remain flexible in case of an opponent with specific-attack hate, in case of your own attack-hate being applicable/not-applicable that turn, or other corner cases such as the resolution of Support effects and Activate effects that may change attacks at the last minute. In addition, when you choose a with Jamming, you are allowed to reveal the attack before Supports resolve, void the opponent’s support and Cross-ability, then use Research to change your attack to something like for a devastating combo.

What’s bad about it: Like most options, Research is Support-timing only and is mostly a corner-case or utility card that isn’t always going to be applicable. In some ways, it’s also a crutch as a player who’s excellent at attack prediction will rarely need Research outside of special cases. In most cases, confirming what attack you suspect was chosen is far weaker than playing a card to actually capitalize on it, which is where its “utility-ness” can be a drawback. Lastly, there’s a heavy downside in that you may only see your opponent’s choice when your level is lower, which immediately rules out several situations and deck structures.

Tips: Research is a card that helps you when you don’t know what to do; If you’re not very good at prediction, it can fill that gap in your skill. The card is strongest when your Digimon has counter (anything), to-zero (anything) or jamming—possibly flatten (specific attack) in some decks. There are times in the game where your opponent can use all their attacks equally effectively. In these instances, Research tends to shine. If your level is equal or higher, Research is most useful on your own turn, as you may be able to benefit from the attack change regardless, especially if their support gives away the choice. This tends to be an excellent choice in a deck that heavily abuses Cross abilities but also low-level decks. Sometimes one of the most effective strategies is playing 3 plus a proxy with several Rookies that have different counter-attack abilities.

Digimon COTD: Silver Ball

Silver Ball—more like cannon ball

What’s good about it:  Doubles your power and sets the opponent’s to 0, allowing an easy come-from-behind when you lose the evolution race. Since your own Digimon can be any level when used, it can also act as a “get ahead” gambit that preserves your own health while taking a significant chunk out of the opponent. The “If not” case can be really helpful as well, though not as strong as cards dedicated to discarding. Discard 1 can disrupt your opponents ability to evolve, rack DP, Support on the next turn, or even dump them into the dreaded 0-card hand.

What’s bad about it: Silver Ball tends to be least effective when your opponent is stalling or losing, which makes it less effective if there’s a significant gap in deck or player strength. Until such time, it’s a mere discard 1 which can be difficult to time properly or prioritize when you should presumably have more impactful effects. Having multiples of this card is therefore not very recommended.

Tips: Since, most every deck tries to evolve to Ultimate and Mega Digimon—which are big and hit hard, Silver Ball tends to be devastating when played at the right time. Put one of this card in your deck and most of the time it acts like having a second ACE. It should almost always start in the side pile, so as not to clog the opening hand. Key moments to play this card are when the opponent is Level R or C but has 1 card in hand or when they’re U or M and doubling the power would decrease the number of hits-to-KO. Alternatively, when they’re at Level U or M and their attack would KO. When you calculate potential damage for both players, it can sometimes be better to wait for your opponent to reach Mega. If you can tell the current Ultimate won’t deal a knockout blow and the Silver Ball is close enough to KOing their Mega (they haven’t played yet), try saving it for that instance and net two KOs! Silver ball is both a sword and shield against the strongest Digimon in the game; as such, it is a tool from which every deck can benefit.

Digimon COTD: Cyclomon & Monochromon

Cyclomon and Monochromon—A Double feature of evo-bonus madness! These two dynamos of Evolution are quite similar in may regards, leading to today’s unique COTD.

What’s good about them: The evo-bonuses of these two Digimon combine deck searching—one of the strongest effects in the game, with Evolution cards—one of the most powerful cards when used correctly. Both effects tend to be limited but very powerful, which is mirrored by the the Monochromon Cyclomon duo themselves. They add significant speed and consistency with regard to activating evolution effects. Monochromon in particular has a very nice balance in having a strong attack set, aggressive Support, and sturdy health. Cyclomon likewise is even more sturdy, nearly as good of an attack set, though more niche Support use. The Cyclomon support can still be great for attack fixing and the peek beforehand allows using punishing Cross effects. to Zero is a solid Cross ability that both share and with enough of it in a deck, Cyclomon’s support becomes truly horrifying. Not only for fast evolutions like Digivice or Super Tag, this evo-bonus helps toolbox utility evolutions like Burst Growth, Meatvolution, or Plug-In A. On top of that, it can search the ACE evolutions Download and Super Evolve, in addition to the Firewall evolve Immortalize!

What’s bad about them: Independently, Monochromon’s support is situational to when using Circle and Cyclomon to when potentially wanting to use Cross but only when you’re unsure. Additionally Cyclomon’s Support is limited to Dragon while Monochromon tends to work well in both Dragon and Nature decks. Playing both in the same deck for their evo-bonuses is quite difficult, though this is more of a denial of a super bonus than a strict downside. The evo-bonus is very central to these cards so they lack luster in decks that aren’t tailor-made for their evolution tree, which limits effective deck building. Some evolutions like Warp Digivolve or Data Hijack are a bit less effective simply due to the nature of their levels.

Tips: Don’t try to run Monochromon and Cyclomon together unless you have a really good plan. The deck will tend to be unfocused and Rookies will be inconsistent. Losing consistency to gain an effect that improves consistency is pretty counterintuitive. It’s heavily suggested to use a partner that can evolve to one of these, since you’ll get the Evolution search for free and the partner itself can be searched. One of the downsides of Hyper Digivolve is that it’s generally central to a strategy yet limited to 2 copies and that is considerably remedied by this search effect. Don’t forget to re-consider all the evolutions you normally avoid due to limited utility now that they can be searched, in addition to considering obvious choices like Download, Super Evolve, and Immortalize. If you have a single copy of many types of utility evolutions (Incubator, Sniper Disk, Plug-In Backup), you should always have the right tool for the right job, if potentially one evolve-phase late. D-Link in particular takes on new life when used with Monochromon or Cyclomon since it implies all of your Ultimates can be of a different type and it won’t matter (plus they’re cheaper). D-Link would therefore open up many new creative combinations.

Digimon COTD: Magic Word

Uh…uh…uh…you didn’t say the

Magic Word—A new firewall that stops Any Phase effects and sticks around to void.

What’s good about it: If you’re good at attack prediction, this card can gain almost endless voiding of Digimon, which is incredible value. Magic Word also heavily punishes decks that use evolution box bonuses to lower DP costs, which can throw off their entire evolution progression. Any Phase effects can be some of the most flexible and hard to deal with effects in the game since they occur outside of normal play. No more sudden use of Digi-Diamond, Kabuterimon, or RedOtamamon, just to name some. They would have to Support with those effects—the Digimon you can continuously void; the Option you can void by merely trashing the Magic Word! Having the ability to trash it at any time to void Options can make opponents play their Options more conservatively, so it’s always threatening.

What’s bad about it: Magic word is a two-edged sword—you don’t get to use “Any Phase” or evolution boxes either. Depending on whose turn it is and what your opponent plays, it can be a played around or voided (on initial Support). Suppose you’re bad at prediction, or the opponent is better: your Magic Word’s usability drops off significantly. This can easily make it worse than any other Firewall. More than one Magic Word at a time is pretty much nonsense unless your opponent supports with an Option so you can trash it. Other firewalls tend to be far more usable one after another. Lastly, Shatter is an attack ability, which this doesn’t void, and it gets rid of Magic Word.

Tips: Try to keep your “Any Phase” effects to a minimum. DATA cards may still be worth it, especially since you can dictate the terms of when it leaves play to some degree. Try to ensure your own deck doesn’t require evolution box bonuses for decreasing DP. Try cards that attach directly from the deck! In this way, Tyrannomons can become extra copies of Magic Word in the deck. Love Crest and Moxie are good for decks that aren’t attempting to “double-dip” on the evoboxes, since the deck should be able to evolve fine without them but can get nice bonuses when these are attached instead of Magic Word. “Research” lets you mismatch your attack, guaranteed.

Digimon COTD: Puppet Switch

Puppet Switch—Setup your hand and DP.

What’s good about it: Puppet Switch puts any card in your trash in your hand. This card is fantastic for reusing powerful cards, and setting up for high DP cost Digimon. Just imagining the possibilities with Ace cards, for instance: you could re-use Warp Dimension, netting you 18 cards of deck damage. Also, since you can change your type, this is usable with an attachment that fell into the trash along the road that your current active zone can’t use. You could change your type to Metal and re-use a Miracle crest to suddenly gain support effects outside of Metal’s domain.

You can do almost everything Puppet Switch does with other cards, but it always takes more than one card (and therefore turn) to set up these sorts of scenarios. This is a high-value card that can give players a host of new and unexpected outs. Most opponents wouldn’t consider a clutch Puppet Switch when playing out their turn. The fact that it gets back cards like evolutions or Digimon that were paid into DP means you can get insane DP value for later evolutions. Example: rack a Redotamamon for +40P, evolve, support with Puppet Switch and get back the Redotamamon, then it gives you +10P. By your next opportunity to evolve, you’ll have a guaranteed 50P and a net card advantage of +0. Lastly, a deck with x3 VS against your type can fall apart if you change your type away (plus you’ll net some sweet cards and DP out of the deal).

What’s bad about it: This card can’t be charged into DP normally—you have to play it as support to get it there. If you’re not set up for multi-color, you lose one of its effects; and if you are, you need a tight evolution-box line.

Tips: If you’re looking to reuse specific cards in your deck, Puppet Switch is a good universal way to do it without splashing into Jungle or Enigma. In fact, Puppet Switch is a good way to unlock the potential of your existing cards and therefore provides good universal synergy. Many games can come down to a well-timed Ace play that doesn’t get voided, so Puppet Switch on reusable Aces can give you the edge to win.

Digimon COTD: Black Gear

Black Gear—If your level is lower…

What’s good about it: Black Gear is a protective Option for when your Level is lower. It grants a variety of boons depending on your Opponent’s Level; each as good as or better than other cards. C is better “Heap of Junk” with “Whistle” stacked on top. U is a weaker “Training Manual” plus killing off all their most damaging Power. M lets you immediately refresh your HP, potentially getting as much as free warp from Rookie to Ultimate.

What’s bad about it: You get nothing unless you’re behind in evolution. Everything you get is based on your opponent, which can make it more situational. The M-level ability fails immediately if you’re at Level U, and has to be set up prior to supporting. You can’t change your attack if you get to evolve with this.

Tips: At first, Black Gear looks difficult to control. The conditional can be easily accounted for by simply using it in a slow-evolution deck,—giving second-evolver advantage while protecting against the first-evolver. A mostly-Rookies deck makes constant use of Black Gear to the fullest. “Whistle”, “Research” and other cards with the same conditional can intersect and strengthen the deck’s overall protection. While determining whether the M-level effect is what you want, consider prepping for it with previously mentioned protective cards, while waiting for a strong ultimate like “Gigadramon” or “Wargrowlmon”, which could end up netting you 2 KOs.

Digimon COTD: Whamon

Whamon (Level U)—The magic of an Ultimate that evolves from itself.

What’s good about it: Whamon (like his Champion form) has the highest printed HP of any Digimon in its level. The Evo-box bonuses featuring “Whamon” push the HP even higher. Whamon in the Evo-box gives this card a built in “Mutate” letting you evolve from U to U if you would like. Its Support ability is also very nice getting tons more HP if you can keep your hand relatively stable.

What’s bad about it: This card has low Power—closer to a Champion rather than an Ultimate. Its to zero ability is very under-powered.

Tips: Whamon (like most Ultimates) wants a dedicated deck with lots of evolution cards that can supplement its built-in Mutate. Running “Download” as your ace with cards like “level Crush”, “Plugin Back-up” and “Burst Growth” can give you extra effects with your extra Evolution, and keep the Whamons coming.

Digimon COTD: Data Hijack

Data Hijack—Evolve from your deck and charge extra DP.

What’s good about it: Data Hijack’s primary effect is to evolve to level C straight from the deck. Evolve from deck is bonkers, letting you take full advantage of every Champion in your deck, as long as it’s a legal target. It’s second effect doesn’t require you to evolve, meaning you can use it even if you can’t go up—If that’s the case, the second effect lets you virtually charge twice before Evolving (by DP instead of the primary effect), or reveal the top card of your deck before the support phase. After use, it deletes itself so you don’t accidentally get flooded with this card after recycle effects (this is usually a good thing, since re-using a card like this is rare and requires tricky timing, while it clogs the hand).

What’s bad about it: At mid to late game, this card can be rather dull— especially if you are not at Level R or you didn’t have a valid card on the top of your deck (cards with +P).

Tips: Data Hijack loses consistency as the game progresses. If you have no other evolution to play and this is stuck in your hand (usually stopping you from draw 2 each turn), consider playing it and checking the top of the deck—at the very least, you get to check your upcoming card. Mixing this into decks with extra Champions or a variety of them can let you toolbox your evolution. Try running with “Shogungekomon”, “Cherrymon” or Champions with a wide variety of evolution-box effects.

Digimon COTD: Coliseum

Coliseum—Changing both players attacks to  with various bonuses for yourself.

What’s good about it: Coliseum boosting your power is very helpful. Forcing a fight can be very necessary when you need to prevent  abilities like drain and 1st attack. Especially if you want to use your circle with impunity.

What’s bad about it: tends to be the strongest attack for the majority of digimon. the bonus effects aren’t always that helpful at letting your attack happen on your opponents turn.

Tips: Coliseum is a tricky card to pin down, its extra effect tends to seem more random than it is, if you can figure out you opponents best move generally you know what effect your going to get. it’s best to use this on your turn when your opponent is most likely to use abilities to get extra damage out or survive to evolve on their turn. In some instances, you can get 200 Power and the change, making it comparable to an Attack Chip without the threat of counter (or “to zero” effects).

Digimon COTD: Miracle Ruby

Miracle Ruby—the ACE that keeps on giving.

What’s good about it: “Any Phase,” Miracle Ruby doesn’t use your Support for turn. 1000 HP is a fair amount to Revive with. You will see this card again and again, at least until your opponent hits 4 KOs. Revival reduces KO points given to 1, regardless of being a Mega or other effects in play.

What’s bad about it: Like with all Revival effects this card still grants your opponent KO points.

Tips: Combining with Megas that can get Aces like “Metaletemon” can let you use this without aggressive mulligans, letting you go full-power for far longer. Mega-centric evolution strategies like “Hyper Digivolve”, or Megas with Champion DNAs (like “Goldnumemon” and “Saberleomon”) can use this to force your opponent to KO your mega 4 times. Use cards like “Metal Banana” at that point to stay in the game with a large body that can deal a lot of punishment. Beware that revival-loops can be good, but can also trap you into a known-defeatable strategy. Consider letting one pass if your opponent sets up against it too much.

Digimon COTD: Incubator

Incubator—An Evolution from the up coming Data Beakers set. Attach a card from your deck while evolving.

What’s good about it: Incubator lets you set up your newly-evolved Digimon for a much more fruitful lifespan right out of the box. It replaces itself after you use it, with the handy draw 1. Since you’re evolving by DP to use the effect, it also stacks with the effect of “Super Tag”. This is easily one of the best toolbox cards in the game due to how hard it is to void evolutions.

What’s bad about it: This card is an Evolution that gives you no discounts or ways to speed up evolution; thus your plan needs to be sound from the beginning. Incubator doesn’t let you get “Sincerity Mask” or cards like it. You can’t use it on any Digimon that is not actually evolving right then, including abnormals.

Tips: Running several different attachments can really help Incubator shine—one of the Crests and “Stardom” are a good starting point. Running “Super Tag” with this lets you keep your DP with the attach. Remember, look for the words “Attach to…” for cards that are legal attachment targets. Not just anything can be attached, you know!

Digimon COTD: Gold Treasure

Gold Treasure—A Partnerable Option that helps you get Champions and Ultimates from your deck.

What’s good about it: Gold Treasure can fetch you a Digimon for evolution; or you can be cheeky and use it to toolbox supports. The card you search can be one that either has your active in its evo-box or has some card you reveal from hand in its evo-box. The reveal isn’t forced—you don’t have to give up any extra info to your opponent if you only need something that comes from your active.

What’s bad about it: This card is a utility card, it helps you for the next turn, not this one.

Tips: Gold Treasure can let you run a wider variety of Champions and Ultimates in your deck and toolbox them for support and evolution box effects. It’s also really helpful for setting up DNA evolution for Ultimates. You can also do really weird things with some of the less-orthodox evo-box names like “Whamon”. If you have the Ultimate Whamon in hand or on active, you can search the same card! If you want to hedge your bets and you have set this as a Partner Option, use it on a Rookie with a good immediate effect: “Renamon” has a void effect that can come in handy when you need something now, while Gold Treasure can set you up if you’re fine.

Digimon COTD: Chip D

Chip D—pure card manipulation of both players decks.

What’s good about it: Chip D lets you know what cards are coming and set-up your deck a little: Recode means you get to look at that many cards from the top of your deck and put them on the top or bottom. “Chip” named cards will become searchable by effects in the upcoming Data Breakers set. You also get a heavy control over your opponent’s deck with Corruption—an effect that lets you seal the opponent’s top two cards in the deck back down or to the bottom.

What’s bad about it: This card is a pure set-up card (it gives you nothing substantial when you play it.) It wont help you when you’re behind. You need to be keeping up with your opponent and wait for the right opportunity to play this.

Tips: Chip D is good when played with powerful trash-cost effects like “Mega Chip” and “Dark Wings.” These cards help both by giving you trash to work with for the “recycle any 2”, and by giving you a very powerful effect to make up for this setup card. This can be a heavy advantage-maker when paired with other Recode/Corrupt effects, ultimately filtering one or both decks into oblivion. “DB006” and “DB007” let you make a Chip-based deck that uses this card heavily for consistently obtaining various Chips.

Digimon COTD: Beam Gun

Beam Gun—Make your Power 0 to halve your opponent’s HP.

What’s good about it: Beam Gun can turn a lop-sided fight in your favor—giving you a virtual attack that is much higher in situations where you’re behind. It’s very helpful for Crash and Counter attacks since they already have 0 Power.

What’s bad about it: Halving isn’t always going to be better than a normal attack, so this card requires specific timing and doesn’t work well when you’re already ahead. Escape Raft is better in situations where halving + attacking would score, and you can spare the 7 cards to trash.

Tips: Run Beam Gun with Crash Digimon, or high HP Digimon (which tend to have lower Power). Try to save Beam Gun for when your opponent gets up to Mega, since they can’t evolve to recover the HP this removes and can set you up for 2 KO points. Running other Beam-Gun-like effects such as “Gazimon” can really help iteratively bring down tanks.

Digimon COTD: Super Tag

Super Tag—an Evolution card that provides +10P and save all your other DP after you evolve.

What’s good about it: Super Tag puts itself into DP, so it doesn’t take your one Rack-up for the turn. It’s one of the few Evolution cards that work when going to Mega. Saving your DP for later has obvious evolution benefits, as well as assisting some effects.

What’s bad about it: This card does nothing for you if you don’t have other cards charged to DP (and progressively better the more you have)—”+10P” is helpful but gets you nowhere on its own. You don’t get to keep your DP if you use an Evolution card that requires DP like “Warp Digivolve”. Since it has to be deleted, you have to plan carefully around the precious few times you can use it.

Tips: This card is amazing for decks that want to evolve quickly and keep evolving consistently. It helps card effects like Rusttyrannomon, Devidramon and Weregarurumon become really powerful. Playing it with the Evolution card “Digivice” will give you even more ways to keep your DP for later. Don’t bother trying to stack Recycle effects to re-use this, since it gets deleted, but recycling can still help you get it in the first place, in case it gets trashed or discarded.