Digimon Battle Evolution

Bit Depth Set Release

 

Bit Depth Full Spoiler

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Flatten Mechanic

Flatten is a mechanic that was released with set Bit Depth. It decreases the dimensions of opposing Digimon until they shrink into a point and vanish!  On its own, flat doesn’t do any damage or cause any immediate effects—instead, it’s a ticking time bomb. So here are the rules:

  • When you meet your condition (in the pic, opponent used Circle, or opponent’s type is Dragon), you will cause a “flat” to the opponent
  • On attack abilities, only one condition can be met per hit. (If a Dragon uses Circle, it only causes 1 flat, not 2.)
  • Track “flat” by taking a card from the top of your deck, if any, and placing it face-down in front of your active. Neither player may look at it.
  • If you would ever have 3 flats, you get KOd! Shuffle all flat trackers back into the deck. Note, this means you must have 3 remaining cards in your deck to be KO’d by “flat”.
  • If you would take damage while you have the 1st Attack and 2 flats, you get KO’d!
  • When you evolve, you can pay 10 DP from anywhere (such as your DP zone or your Immortalize card) to remove 1 flat marker (shuffle it in). You can only remove 1 flat per evolution.

And that’s how it works. Check the rules for an official explanation (glossary or attack abilities). Flatten is specifically intended as an alternate win method, similar to trashing an opponent’s deck out (which may reduce your required KOs). You will still have to use all your cunning and experience to make the most of it, but it can be a powerful KO method. Since it “poisons” a Digimon, opponents may have to slow down their evolutions. Or you could exploit them after they evolve to Mega for 2 KOs. Repeatedly gaining 3 flats can be difficult, even if you maximize your opportunities, so be sure to have a backup plan.

 

Term Change: Proxy card

These little “P” symbols used to be called “Partner Options”. Option like choice not the card type. I bet you can see how this is confusing. Especially when DATA and Evolution cards have the “P” symbol now. There’s a new term change—Proxy. It starts with P, it’s thematic, and it’s what you’ll use now! Just a heads-up.

Digi-Deck: Time Stop

This deck primarily relies on its Ace—Download. By cheesing through Levels rapidly, it can arrive at Millenniumon and effectively stop most opposing strategies, as well as disrupt the speed of the opponent’s play. Using high-body Ultimates like Kimeramon, this deck has an easy time progressing through its evolution steps, with or without its many Evolution cards. It tries to pack an answer for every occasion, then uses Millenniumon’s ability (and DATA card) to refresh the deck of the best solutions for the current matchup. Over a short time, the deck becomes incredibly tooled to the specific opponent being faced.

For high skill players, the deck also tends to have a lack of good prediction effects. Only Millenniumon and Airdramon have good To-Zero specials, with the former’s requiring a turn to set it up. Airdramon won’t be a body on the field for long, but that can hypothetically increase the usability of its To-Zero. Kimeramon has a Cross To-Zero but would rarely use it unless it’s time to evolve or the opponent can gain way too much advantage from a 1st Attack, x3 VS, or Drain ability. Outside of these mundane cases, Set EX Palmon exists in the deck which can give an attack-prediction for +400 Power. This can be absolutely crucial, but if not recycled, is highly limited. Due to the limited predictive power, it is an easier deck to play but also one with less maximum potential.

Types

Primary type: (22)
Lesser types: (8) | (5)
Rare types: (4) | (2)
Mostly weak to Wind x3 VS, but several additional weaknesses occasionally.

Suggested pre-setup side choices:

Prioritize removing these particular cards in the pre-setup. Adjust to your matchup.

  • Millenniumon DATA
  • 2 Mutates + 1 Silver ball
  • Level Crush
  • Vending Machine

This pre-setup removal will prioritize getting as much early-game as possible and minimizing late game. Most games, I will remove the Mutates and Silver Ball over the 3 Firewalls in the deck, just because Firewalls are technically more viable early game most of the time. Level crush is absolutely dead. Millenniumon DATA could be good but only if you lead with an early lot of trashing, which is rare. Vending Machine is even worse because it’s also slow.

 

Credit for the original list goes to member SubZero.

See visual list for specific card versions whenever ambiguous.

Time Stop

Level R: 10

4 (DB) Biyomon – Used primarily for her draw 2, as the evolve effect is only usable early game. Evolve effect is great for not only fixing an early brick but also for toolboxing a specific Level C for the situation needed (Jamming on Aquilamon or Circle hate on Airdramon for example). This can also assist bluffing before attacks are chosen, especially since the other Rs don’t have Circle hate, therefore Airdramon is a great pick; and moves forward into Kimeramon’s DNA.

4 (EX) Palmon – The one and only good predictive card in the deck. Power +400 on the same-prediction is pretty top notch here and can easily end an annoying opposing Level C with too much health or a Level U that slipped in. The alternative helps fuel our main inevitability engine of recuperating the deck.

1 Lucemon – Having the ability to void anything is pretty nice, even though it lets the opponent draw. Even if this gets digimon-voided (but not Firewalled), you still get the type change effect, which can be crucial for activating Aquilamon to fetch the Ace or attaching Kokatorimon to start the engine.

1 Monodramon Partner – This is our partner. I sincerely wish we could use it to evolve or use the support regularly. Unfortunately, until the DATA proxy is used, Monodramon must be considered nothing more than a searchable DATA card for the purposes of Mega evolving. After that, he facilitates our deck quite well. Just about any replacement partner would probably do well here.

 

Level C: 10

4 Airdramon – Decent HP body for stalling until Level U if necessary. Can be devastating if it comes from Biyomon. Can occasionally search Aeroveedramon. Sadly, this support is often a dud and is only necessary for Kimeramon’s easy DNA. When on the active, any Metal (not in deck), Wind or Dragon can be used as DNA for Kimeramon. This essentially means any Level C in this deck.

4 Aquilamon – Despite the ridiculous body on this bird—which is quite handy, the primary use for it is to support and fetch Download. This can be difficult if Download was recycled after evolving to Kimeramon/Millenniumon since their types are Enigma, but their bodies should buy enough time to get a Puppet Switch or Lucemon. This card is absolutely crucial early, then used about once after that to return Download to the hand after it’s recycled and sits in the trash unused.

1 Kokatorimon – This card provides valuable engine-fuel by itself. As long as you don’t lose the active, it should start adding quality to the deck almost immediately. In the ideal game, Kokatorimon isn’t actually usable until a type change occurs, since you would be Downloaded to a Kimeramon. However, Aeroveedramon and Megadramon do exist as temporary surrogates with huge bodies, so the Kokatorimon is still possible on Level U. It cannot be overstated how crucial this attachment is to the function of the deck. If it gets shattered, it should be the top recycle priority for later use. This along with trash-cost cards in the deck can single-handedly set up the deck as a raging inferno.

1 Birdramon – The support can find the partner when KO’d, which is a bit of a setback but absolutely better than not having it. Otherwise, it’s a good functional any-recycle to help boost our deck before its ready.

Level U: 7

4 Kimeramon – Necessary for the main strategy. Large body. Gets us to Millenniumon. Great for Mutate and Level Crush.

2 Megadramon – Primarily in the deck for its Wind typing (to activate supports) and level, Megadramon also boasts a pretty large body in the form of power. This can give us pseudo-Mega power until we’re ready to evolve. HP isn’t much of a concern in this deck when it can effectively bounce around high level Digimon repeatedly, so high Power is far more desirable. The support ability can be incredibly clutch as well, winning several games by KOing opposing Megas and Ultimates.

1 Aeroveedramon – This card has a lot going for it: If you normal evolve to it using Airdramon, it picks a card from the top 3. It has a decent body with a sometimes-necessary 1st Attack that’s pretty high. It can activate Wind-based supports and its own support is incredibly relevant almost all the time, doubling power on Level Us. Regardless, the fail state can give non-Us (such as Millenniumon) 1st Attack on support.

Evolution: 6

2 Mutate – Level-hop from U to U with 300 bonus HP. Ideally, the target is from Aeroveedramon/Megadramon to Kimeramon once the partner is drawn. However, Mutating to stay alive is perfectly valid as well. Make sure to rack the +30Ps in the deck so their costs can be paid.

1 Level Crush – Used almost exclusively to deny the 2KOs when Millenniumon starts to get weak. By the point, the deck should be perfectly set up and Level Crush has a high likelihood of being drawn from a trim and fit deck. Crush down to Kimeramon and start preparing the Download/Mutates for more endurance later. At this point, Kimeramon’s HP would be 4020, which is soul-crushing to face.

1 Download ACE – The bread and butter of the deck. Download should be used liberally, early, and often. Always attempt to recycle this into the deck and bank one in hand in case an HP-refresh is necessary. This card can potentially ensure an opponent never gets a KO.

1 Super Tag – This is a semi-fail state but can assist at getting to Level U without trouble. In addition, it sets up a nice DP contingency in case the main hitter dies unexpectedly. It’s possible to use Super Tag to set up for Mutate.

1 Digivice – Fail state but acts as an effective catch-all for Level U.

Option: 12

2 Puppet Switch – Essential for early re-use of Download and other key components of the deck (Millenniumon DATA). Use this to change to Wind type to enable supports. Keep hand size up. DP bonus helps set up Mutate.

2 Partner Finder – The partner is incredibly key in this deck. The road to Millenniumon is paved with Mugendramon DATA, and so it is our proxy card. The Partner must be in hand to use the proxy, so partner finders are more necessary than it may first seem. The good news is, after the first use, the second finder can be used to shuffle the partner back in, giving them a key appearance late game in case the main attacker gets KO’d with no good replacement. At 2, this deck essentially has 3 chances in the deck to get the partner.

2 Cherrymon’s Mist FIREWALL – This is the most orthodox and reliable Firewall. This could be at 3 copies, but homogeny kills in this deck. This deck requires diversity and re-use.

1 Dark Destroy FIREWALL – The third Firewall should be Dark Destroy. Since Death Evolution will always fail due to our higher level and Jugonsatsu simply adds more tankiness to an already tank deck, Dark Destroy is necessary. The ability to punish supporting with a Level U is devastating when the opponent is behind.

1 Vending Machine – No recycle-based deck would be complete without a Vending Machine. This makes the deck less vulnerable to trash, mulligans, and can help boost setup to the deck thinning process.

1 Training Manual – Necessary to plug a weakness to discard and since the deck needs to dig late game into the streamlined deck.

1 Mega Chip – The cost ironically sets up the deck by removing all cards at an equal rate, but the “recycle any” effects can cherry pick what goes back in. In addition, this makes a devastating blow.

1 Mega Disk – Same as Mega Chip for purpose, but with slighly more trash capability and a significant increase to the deck’s endurance. This is often a target for constant re-use.

1 Silver Ball – Nearly staple leveler of playing fields.

Data: 1

1 Millenniumon DATA – Almost always used as a slightly weaker Any-Phase Vending Machine, hence only one copy of vending machine. If any Data Break occurs, this deck will probably lose.

 

Destiny Zone

Partner: Monodramon

Millenniumon – Main event. Use the Trash 3 cost to set up the trash incrementally. First time, it usually has to change its Cross in order to gain the best effect from the opponent. The most common is To-Zero, but you can always threaten a sudden 1st Attack kill out of nowhere. Bear in mind, this ability stays, it is not a lingering type that gets removed after the turn is over. That means if you choose Crash, be prepared to not only heal but change the Cross after. Always try to use the recycle any 2 if possible since it’s the primary engine of the deck, especially when compounded with Kokatorimon and several supports that do similar things. A one-turn setup can be achieved with a large enough trash, Kokatorimon, Millenniumon DATA any phase, and Vending Machine (recycles any 13 minimum, then sets up the top 3). This is similar to a heavy Recode deck except that it is a bit more flexible and can be faster.

Airdramon – Just used as an emergency to Kimeramon. This will BRICK the Mugendramon DATA!

(BR-059) Coredramon – This green guy has serious tank health in case of the horrifying problem where we partner evolve. Bricks Mugendramon DATA!

Mugendramon DATA Proxy – If only we could use the Data Break or Any Phase without completely bricking the deck. However, the DNA material off of a heavily searchable partner means the deck has maximum consistency for getting to the main event. This card’s existence as the deck’s proxy could be a good argument for running no partner champions, and instead adding 2 cards to the main deck.

Possible Changes

No deck is perfect or unbeatable. Most probably have room for improvement even when not considering the meta. This will be no different. Here’s a list of stuff that just may not work as well as I think it does, that I can see coming:

Super Tag – It’s a good card and has the before mentioned positives. However, it’s more often than not a dead card due to requiring a Puppet Switch from a previous turn for the +10P it provides to be worthwhile. It’s almost better to use Meatvolution for the same purpose.

Megadramon + Aeroveedramon – They’re good obviously. However, they don’t make much sense either. Just about any Level U would be possible here as long as it has Wind. MagnaAngemon could be better just for toolboxing type-hate from the deck. So could Angewomon or Garudamon. The list will only grow as the game gets older. In fact, Aeroveedramon may be completely flawed and Megadramon may be the preferred U. Or none of these types at all, and you could just chance that you won’t need a specific type and try picking something monsterous from another type. Maybe that causes D-Link to look like a better choice than Digivice or Super Tag.

Birdramon – Probably the weakest champion choice in the deck. Howabout Kiwimon for some 1st Attack? Maybe we could run something that increases our Wind-type change consistency.

Monodramon – Almost completely arbitrary. This deck could run just about any partner Digimon since the support and evolutions can never be used until after it’s proxied for a DATA. The possibilities here are endless. Only chosen because it feels weird not to have an extra Airdramon or 60 DP as a support.

The entire Wind typing – Most unusually, the entire deck may be a flawed concept. Wind is certainly a good choice and proved itself in testing thus far. However, a better version of the deck might fail forward by running Monochromon and Cyclomon, to pick Download from the deck on a successful evobox. Admittedly, Kokatorimon carries Wind in this instance, and is the primary reason I stuck with SubZero’s original type choice.

DATA as a proxy – It’s also possible that a better version of the deck might ditch having the DATA as a proxy and searching the partner and just hard-mulligan to the DATA in the main deck and then recovering the trash with oodles of recycle.

 

Destiny Zone

 

Key Points

In the briefest of terms, this is a juggernaut of a deck. It’s incredibly fast and incredibly tooled. Let’s take a look at some of its strengths and weaknesses, and keep these in mind while playing:

  • Incredibly fast. Download, Digivice, Super Tag, and several +30P Digimon make this deck a monster of speed. Skips levels regularly.
  • High endurance. Usually, speed decks lack endurance because they skip crucial stepping stones like Champion Digimon, removing hit-absorption before healing through evolution. This deck uses Download and Mutate to repeatedly skip around level Ultimate, healing constantly. In addition, it Level Crushes from Mega to Ultimate for the same effect. Immense endurance.
  • High Power. Speed decks tend to lack consistent matchup power as opponent catch up to their level. However, this deck abuses high-body Digimon and doesn’t suffer low power here.
  • Inevitability engine. Millenniumon plus his DATA and other picky recycles (Birdramon) allow this deck to continuously weed out the unnecessary cards through the course of the game. Bricking becomes non-existent by late game.
  • Early game can brick. Due to high reliance on Evolution cards to set up, your early game is incredibly vulnerable to well-placed Death Evolutions and simple miss-hands. Mitigate with a liberal opening game mulligan and have a backup plan to evolve orthodox.
  • Vulnerable if it has to mulligan too much. Some decks can bounce back and typically one with this much recycle can, but it tends not to be enough. In fact, the deck tries to actively put bulk in the trash. Surprisingly vulnerable to a trash-oriented deck.
  • Control decks make this a tough matchup. You don’t have much to recover hand size other than set DB Biyomons and single cards. If someone can effectively keep your hand low and fog the game long enough, there’s not many tricks in this deck to overcome that.
  • Circle punishment is devastating. This is a deck that is overly-reliant on Circle until it gets Millenniumon, where it can ride Cross to victory.
  • Lower-level cards are devastating. Data Hijack, Black Gear, Whistle, and the list goes on… low-level cards can grind this deck to a screeching halt, allowing the opponent ample time to catch up. This effectively nullifies all of the speed the deck has built to that point. It would then need to solely rely upon endurance and its inevitability engine.

 

Behind the gears of “Time Stop” lurks a beast ready to awaken. This is a deck that thoroughly abuses time asymmetry—wherein earlier plays tend to compound their effects on the game; not only through insanely fast evolution, but also by streamlining the deck of unnecessary cards based on the opponent. Given this, it’s difficult to soft-counter this deck, much more to hard-counter it. Absolutely top play is necessary from the opponent in order to not get run over immediately.

If Digimon Battle Evolution had tournaments, this is the style of deck I would expect to see at top levels of play. It gets checked hard against Rookie-counter, low-level Crash, and rush decks that pack Circle-hate, but it plays the long game while also setting up totally insurmountable Digimon early. In this respect, it might be comparable to Magic‘s “Tron” deck type in modern. If you’re the type of player that likes to get in early, have a ton of contingency plans, and set up for the long winter, give Time Stop a go!

Credit again, for the original deck list should go to member SubZero. Mostly with respect to the bold idea to have the DATA as the proxy, repeatedly abuse Download, and use a Wind core for consistency. This version of the deck has been adapted to the deck list legality changes that allow more cards (50 shared between the DZ and main deck, adding +6 cards to the deck) and to further refine its main strategy.

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Card template change!

Subtype Change

The card templates for Digimon Battles now reflects the subtypes better. Instead of a permatext denoting that it’s “Also ” etc, it now displays all the subtypes in a new black bar under the primary type icon. The site currently has all the new images updated but TTS and OCTGN do not yet. The change is superficial only, so you won’t be required to update your decks. Example of the change below:

Promo Cards – Dukemon & Herculeskabuterimon

Along with some emergency-erratas taking place after the launch of Data Breakers, we’re bringing two new Promo cards that will be legal for play and available on both Tabletop Simulator and OCTGN: Dukemon and Herculeskabuterimon.

Originally, these cards were slated for a much later set release that would likely come out at the end of the year. Instead, we’re moving them up since they’re fully ready for play and to apologize for the mini-errata coming soon, as well as the lack of COTDs. Those COTDs did have to be put on hold temporarily however, since much of our attention has been diverted attempting to convert Alsciende’s NetrunnerDB into a DigimonDB, as well as other side-projects. For now, we’re shelving it since it’s eating up too much time and should return to COTDs and design shortly. Without further ado, here are the new cards!

These aren’t being released as part of a specific set. Instead, they are numbered for the “PR” or “Promo” pool of cards. We’ve had promotional cards before, but they were always previews of upcoming sets. This time, we’re starting a promo pool so cards can be released in-between sets, especially ones that would be nice to have in the game but won’t fit within the parameters of the next set.

These aren’t really an apology and were going to be released anyway :)

Digimon COTD: Whamon

Whamon (Level U)—The magic of an Ultimate that evolves from itself.

What’s good about it: Whamon (like his Champion form) has the highest printed HP of any Digimon in its level. The Evo-box bonuses featuring “Whamon” push the HP even higher. Whamon in the Evo-box gives this card a built in “Mutate” letting you evolve from U to U if you would like. Its Support ability is also very nice getting tons more HP if you can keep your hand relatively stable.

What’s bad about it: This card has low Power—closer to a Champion rather than an Ultimate. Its to zero ability is very under-powered.

Tips: Whamon (like most Ultimates) wants a dedicated deck with lots of evolution cards that can supplement its built-in Mutate. Running “Download” as your ace with cards like “level Crush”, “Plugin Back-up” and “Burst Growth” can give you extra effects with your extra Evolution, and keep the Whamons coming.

Digimon COTD: Data Hijack

Data Hijack—Evolve from your deck and charge extra DP.

What’s good about it: Data Hijack’s primary effect is to evolve to level C straight from the deck. Evolve from deck is bonkers, letting you take full advantage of every Champion in your deck, as long as it’s a legal target. It’s second effect doesn’t require you to evolve, meaning you can use it even if you can’t go up—If that’s the case, the second effect lets you virtually charge twice before Evolving (by DP instead of the primary effect), or reveal the top card of your deck before the support phase. After use, it deletes itself so you don’t accidentally get flooded with this card after recycle effects (this is usually a good thing, since re-using a card like this is rare and requires tricky timing, while it clogs the hand).

What’s bad about it: At mid to late game, this card can be rather dull— especially if you are not at Level R or you didn’t have a valid card on the top of your deck (cards with +P).

Tips: Data Hijack loses consistency as the game progresses. If you have no other evolution to play and this is stuck in your hand (usually stopping you from draw 2 each turn), consider playing it and checking the top of the deck—at the very least, you get to check your upcoming card. Mixing this into decks with extra Champions or a variety of them can let you toolbox your evolution. Try running with “Shogungekomon”, “Cherrymon” or Champions with a wide variety of evolution-box effects.

Digimon Partners

What’s a Partner?

A partner can be any Level R (Rookie) in the game. You’ll want to have one in every deck, since they confer distinct and inarguable advantages that normal Rookies just don’t offer. Things can get a bit complicated, so it’s let’s break down what a partner can do:

  • Evolve very quickly, before the Evolution Phase even
  • Toolbox one of two specific Champions for you
  • Ignore DP and type while evolving from the Destiny Zone
  • Use certain Option/Evolution/DATA cards as a proxy

How are they used?

Partners can be used in one of a couple scenarios in the game, and have several rules tailored specifically for odd cases they create. They’re essentially, a dedicated rule-breaker. Here are some of the scenarios, and a walkthrough of how partners change them: Read more

Digimon COTD: Plug-In Backup

Plug-In Backup—Keep your deck big and quality while evolving.

What’s good about it: Since you often have to use Rookies for Rack-Up, this returns them back to the deck, which is necessary for keeping up throughout late game. Since you get to choose everything that goes back in, it’s very quality and can increase the long-term draw quality. This respects “Super Tag”, allowing you to simply Recycle any 2, making your next 2 draws/supports anything from your trash.

What’s bad about it: Way early game, you usually don’t have the recycle live. Requires evolving by DP, though that should be the norm for shuffling in your DP. Doesn’t shine in decks that can 1-Rack evolve. It can be small potatoes even if you plan for it properly.

Tips: Make sure you’re not trying to use lots of external DP-gain effects such as Monodramon, Raremon, or evo-box bonuses for this. If you do, you’ll lose out on a lot of its potency. This is similar to a Vending Machine that you use during evolution, but that combos better with Super Tag allowing you to do remarkable setups where you re-use key cards like Firewalls and Aces immediately after evolution. This is best used early-mid, or midgame when your trash has the highest potential for abuse OR after deliberately hard-mulling your hands a few times to search your Ace, use it, evolve with this, then re-use the ace. This can also work well without Super Tag, since you’ll be getting that Ace/Firewall later in the game too. If you find yourself running out of quality Rack-Up later in the game, causing a loss (common problem), try Plug-In Backup.

Why Are Megas so Weird

Okay, I admit, almost none of you actually asked this question to yourselves. Maybe a few who played the game Digimon Battles was based on: Digimon World: Digital Card Battles for Playstation. In that game, all the Mega Digimon were Level U (Ultimate). It may have even shocked some of you to see Digimon like HerculeseKabuterimon, Phoenixmon, and Wargreymon labeled as “U”! Why might that be?

It’s all about balance: try playing this game with a 30 card deck instead, 4 copies of any card (not the 4, 3, 2, 1 cascading limits I put on them) and then try running 4 levels of cards in the deck. It’s madness! You won’t have nearly enough room in a deck to make any of this consistent. But at the time, the Mega-level Digimon were the star of the show and not including them would’ve seemed out of touch with the intellectual property. So they were downgraded a level, but most of them kept insane power in some way or another (usually with added cost). Read more

Data Breakers Set Release

  • New set released! Let’s dive right in. What does this set contain?

    • 50 New game cards
    • New type: Ruler (4 cards)
    • New card type: DATA (5 cards)
    • New keywords
    • Partnerable ACE (1 card)
    • New card type Firewall (3 cards)
    • 8 new Rookies (one in each printed type)
    • 13 Champions
    • 7 Ultimates
    • 6 Megas
    • 7 new Evolution cards
    • Fan-favorite Digimons!
  • Links here will take you straight to an explanation of each new thing in the set!

    Ruler Type
    Data Cards
    Firewalls
    Gallery of All Cards (Full Layout)
    COTDs for SetDB
    Erratas Pror to Update

Data Breakers Full Spoiler

Read more

What are Firewalls in Digimon Battles

 

A quick aside coming off the heels of today’s COTD: Death Evolution. It’s listed as a firewall. Firewall cards are Options that usually Void in some way. Cherrymon’s Mist was the original firewall and has been erratad as such. The card is so staple that every deck needed 3 copies to compete. Stuff like this can’t be nerfed or removed or it would negatively affect the health of the game, but we also don’t like the idea of hard staples being the first cards you put into a new deck. Maybe if this were a pool of cards instead…

Thus the Firewall keyword was born. It’s similar to how Ace cards work: You can have 3 of any firewalls in your deck, period. Essentially what this means is you can still run 3 Cherrymon’s Mist, but then you might miss out on other effects like the aforementioned Death Evolution. You could run 1 Mist and 2 Death Evolution. Or mix and match between the 3 new firewalls in Data Breakers and the original Mist in Base Release. Each one might fundamentally void effects, but all are pretty powerful (almost Ace-worthy, almost).

It will definitely be a priority for us to make more Firewall-keyworded cards, so that players have plenty of strategy, can express themselves through their cards, and you know…don’t show up to a cocktail party in the same dress!