April 2018

Digi-Deck: Time Stop

This deck primarily relies on its Ace—Download. By cheesing through Levels rapidly, it can arrive at Millenniumon and effectively stop most opposing strategies, as well as disrupt the speed of the opponent’s play. Using high-body Ultimates like Kimeramon, this deck has an easy time progressing through its evolution steps, with or without its many Evolution cards. It tries to pack an answer for every occasion, then uses Millenniumon’s ability (and DATA card) to refresh the deck of the best solutions for the current matchup. Over a short time, the deck becomes incredibly tooled to the specific opponent being faced.

For high skill players, the deck also tends to have a lack of good prediction effects. Only Millenniumon and Airdramon have good To-Zero specials, with the former’s requiring a turn to set it up. Airdramon won’t be a body on the field for long, but that can hypothetically increase the usability of its To-Zero. Kimeramon has a Cross To-Zero but would rarely use it unless it’s time to evolve or the opponent can gain way too much advantage from a 1st Attack, x3 VS, or Drain ability. Outside of these mundane cases, Set EX Palmon exists in the deck which can give an attack-prediction for +400 Power. This can be absolutely crucial, but if not recycled, is highly limited. Due to the limited predictive power, it is an easier deck to play but also one with less maximum potential.

Types

Primary type: (22)
Lesser types: (8) | (5)
Rare types: (4) | (2)
Mostly weak to Wind x3 VS, but several additional weaknesses occasionally.

Suggested pre-setup side choices:

Prioritize removing these particular cards in the pre-setup. Adjust to your matchup.

  • Millenniumon DATA
  • 2 Mutates + 1 Silver ball
  • Level Crush
  • Vending Machine

This pre-setup removal will prioritize getting as much early-game as possible and minimizing late game. Most games, I will remove the Mutates and Silver Ball over the 3 Firewalls in the deck, just because Firewalls are technically more viable early game most of the time. Level crush is absolutely dead. Millenniumon DATA could be good but only if you lead with an early lot of trashing, which is rare. Vending Machine is even worse because it’s also slow.

 

Credit for the original list goes to member SubZero.

See visual list for specific card versions whenever ambiguous.

Time Stop
Destiny Zone
Possible Changes

 

Destiny Zone

Key Points

In the briefest of terms, this is a juggernaut of a deck. It’s incredibly fast and incredibly tooled. Let’s take a look at some of its strengths and weaknesses, and keep these in mind while playing:

  • Incredibly fast. Download, Digivice, Super Tag, and several +30P Digimon make this deck a monster of speed. Skips levels regularly.
  • High endurance. Usually, speed decks lack endurance because they skip crucial stepping stones like Champion Digimon, removing hit-absorption before healing through evolution. This deck uses Download and Mutate to repeatedly skip around level Ultimate, healing constantly. In addition, it Level Crushes from Mega to Ultimate for the same effect. Immense endurance.
  • High Power. Speed decks tend to lack consistent matchup power as opponent catch up to their level. However, this deck abuses high-body Digimon and doesn’t suffer low power here.
  • Inevitability engine. Millenniumon plus his DATA and other picky recycles (Birdramon) allow this deck to continuously weed out the unnecessary cards through the course of the game. Bricking becomes non-existent by late game.
  • Early game can brick. Due to high reliance on Evolution cards to set up, your early game is incredibly vulnerable to well-placed Death Evolutions and simple miss-hands. Mitigate with a liberal opening game mulligan and have a backup plan to evolve orthodox.
  • Vulnerable if it has to mulligan too much. Some decks can bounce back and typically one with this much recycle can, but it tends not to be enough. In fact, the deck tries to actively put bulk in the trash. Surprisingly vulnerable to a trash-oriented deck.
  • Control decks make this a tough matchup. You don’t have much to recover hand size other than set DB Biyomons and single cards. If someone can effectively keep your hand low and fog the game long enough, there’s not many tricks in this deck to overcome that.
  • Circle punishment is devastating. This is a deck that is overly-reliant on Circle until it gets Millenniumon, where it can ride Cross to victory.
  • Lower-level cards are devastating. Data Hijack, Black Gear, Whistle, and the list goes on… low-level cards can grind this deck to a screeching halt, allowing the opponent ample time to catch up. This effectively nullifies all of the speed the deck has built to that point. It would then need to solely rely upon endurance and its inevitability engine.

 

Behind the gears of “Time Stop” lurks a beast ready to awaken. This is a deck that thoroughly abuses time asymmetry—wherein earlier plays tend to compound their effects on the game; not only through insanely fast evolution, but also by streamlining the deck of unnecessary cards based on the opponent. Given this, it’s difficult to soft-counter this deck, much more to hard-counter it. Absolutely top play is necessary from the opponent in order to not get run over immediately.

If Digimon Battle Evolution had tournaments, this is the style of deck I would expect to see at top levels of play. It gets checked hard against Rookie-counter, low-level Crash, and rush decks that pack Circle-hate, but it plays the long game while also setting up totally insurmountable Digimon early. In this respect, it might be comparable to Magic‘s “Tron” deck type in modern. If you’re the type of player that likes to get in early, have a ton of contingency plans, and set up for the long winter, give Time Stop a go!

Credit again, for the original deck list should go to member SubZero. Mostly with respect to the bold idea to have the DATA as the proxy, repeatedly abuse Download, and use a Wind core for consistency. This version of the deck has been adapted to the deck list legality changes that allow more cards (50 shared between the DZ and main deck, adding +6 cards to the deck) and to further refine its main strategy.

Top

Digimon COTD: Puppet Switch

Puppet Switch—Setup your hand and DP.

What’s good about it: Puppet Switch puts any card in your trash in your hand. This card is fantastic for reusing powerful cards, and setting up for high DP cost Digimon. Just imagining the possibilities with Ace cards, for instance: you could re-use Warp Dimension, netting you 18 cards of deck damage. Also, since you can change your type, this is usable with an attachment that fell into the trash along the road that your current active zone can’t use. You could change your type to Metal and re-use a Miracle crest to suddenly gain support effects outside of Metal’s domain.

You can do almost everything Puppet Switch does with other cards, but it always takes more than one card (and therefore turn) to set up these sorts of scenarios. This is a high-value card that can give players a host of new and unexpected outs. Most opponents wouldn’t consider a clutch Puppet Switch when playing out their turn. The fact that it gets back cards like evolutions or Digimon that were paid into DP means you can get insane DP value for later evolutions. Example: rack a Redotamamon for +40P, evolve, support with Puppet Switch and get back the Redotamamon, then it gives you +10P. By your next opportunity to evolve, you’ll have a guaranteed 50P and a net card advantage of +0. Lastly, a deck with x3 VS against your type can fall apart if you change your type away (plus you’ll net some sweet cards and DP out of the deal).

What’s bad about it: This card can’t be charged into DP normally—you have to play it as support to get it there. If you’re not set up for multi-color, you lose one of its effects; and if you are, you need a tight evolution-box line.

Tips: If you’re looking to reuse specific cards in your deck, Puppet Switch is a good universal way to do it without splashing into Jungle or Enigma. In fact, Puppet Switch is a good way to unlock the potential of your existing cards and therefore provides good universal synergy. Many games can come down to a well-timed Ace play that doesn’t get voided, so Puppet Switch on reusable Aces can give you the edge to win.